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Clinical Medicine: the Youngest Science

Friends of the CIHR presents a video series in the history of medicine in Canada featuring video clips from the Friesen Lectures and other sources.

This is the first of a four part series featuring excerpts from Dr. David Naylor’s lecture “Emergence of Health Research as a Data Science” from the 2018 Henry G. Friesen International Prize in Health Research. Dr. Naylor is Professor of Medicine and President Emeritus of the University of Toronto, as well as past Dean of Medicine at the University of Toronto.

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Mercy Mission

Constance Beattie in the summer of 1949, at Fairway Island (known today as Pitsiulartok) in Hudson Bay. [Photo: courtesy of Beattie's nephew Chuck Beattie]

“When polio struck an Inuit community in the late 1940s, it led to a tragedy that shocked the country. A physiotherapist was urgently needed to help treat Inuit polio victims in the Arctic settlement of Chesterfield Inlet on the west coast of Hudson Bay. Constance “Connie” Beattie was the only real choice to answer a distress call issued by the Department of Indian Affairs in late March 1949.”

Club member Christopher Rutty has an article, “Mercy Mission,” originally published in the Feb-March 2018 issue of Canada’s History Magazine about the fascinating story of Constance Beattie’s medical mission to the Arctic.

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Dr. Brenda Milner interview

The Friends of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research has published a video celebrating Dr. Brenda Milner’s upcoming 103rd birthday on July 15, 2021. Brenda Milner is a founder of modern Neuropsychology and Distinguished Professor in the Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, McGill University. This is an interview conducted by Michael Bliss, May 13th, 2013. They discuss Dr. Milner’s early interest in science.

For more information about FCIHR, their Video History of Medicine in Canada program, and other programs and projects, please visit their website: http://www.fcihr.ca/

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After the Pandemic

Major twentieth-century disease outbreaks in Canada included influenza, smallpox, diphtheria, and polio. [Photographic Illustration by James Gillespie, Canada's History]

Chris Rutty has a new article “After the Pandemic” in Canada’s History about how Canada’s experience of past disease outbreaks may provide clues to the post-pandemic future.

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Leone Norwood Farrell and the Salk Vaccine

Dr. Leone Farrell, c. 1950s (courtesy Sanofi Pasteur Canada Archives, Connaught Campus)

Christopher Rutty has written an entry for the The Canadian Encyclopedia on the biochemist and microbiologist, Leone Norwood Farrell. Farrell was a pioneer in vaccine development. Her “Toronto Method” made possible the large-scale production of the Salk Vaccine for polio